Semiconductor Engineering

Rapid Exchange Cooling With Trapped Ions For Implementation In A Quantum Charge-Coupled Device

A technical paper titled “Rapid exchange cooling with trapped ions” was published by researchers at Georgia Tech Research Institute.

“The trapped-ion quantum charge-coupled device (QCCD) architecture is a leading candidate for advanced quantum information processing. In current QCCD implementations, imperfect ion transport and anomalous heating can excite ion motion during a calculation. To counteract this, intermediate cooling is necessary to maintain high-fidelity gate performance...."

Phys.org

New ion cooling technique could simplify quantum computing devices

A new cooling technique that utilizes a single species of trapped ion for both computing and cooling could simplify the use of quantum charge-coupled devices (QCCDs), potentially moving quantum computing closer to practical applications.

Using a technique called rapid ion exchange cooling, scientists at the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) have shown that they could cool a calcium ion, which gains vibrational energy while doing quantum computations—by moving a cold ion of the same species into close proximity. After transferring energy from the hot ion to the cold one, the refrigerant ion is returned to a nearby reservoir to be cooled for further use.

Food Safety Magazine

Salvus Announces Licensing Agreement with Georgia Tech that Enables PFAS Detection

Salvus, LLC, a CJB Company, has entered into a licensing agreement with Georgia Tech Research Corporation (GTRC) to gain access to PFAS sensing technology for use in the Salvus™ Detection Platform, the world’s first handheld interferometric detector. Utilizing GTRC’s sensing capabilities for PFAS, the term commonly used for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, enables Salvus to pursue development and commercialization efforts within industries where PFAS detection, remediation, and destruction are essential.

TechXplore

Digital inspection portal uses AI and machine vision to examine moving trains

Collaboration between Norfolk Southern Corporation and the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) has led to the development of digital train inspection portals that use advanced machine vision and artificial intelligence to examine trains moving at speeds of up to 60 miles per hour to identify mechanical defects that may exist.

AFCEA Signal

Radar Data Processing Just Got Better

Researchers at the Georgia Tech Research Institute recently combined machine learning, field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), graphics processing units (GPUs), and a novel radio frequency image processing algorithm to streamline radar signal processing time and costs by two or three orders of magnitude. The advance could ultimately benefit real-time analysis of radar imaging data from potential enemy targets and autonomous vehicles and drones and might also be used for quantum sensing.

Georgia Public Broadcasting (GPB)

Public insurance claim database will give a better look at health care access in Georgia

Early next year, the public will have access to a new tool that makes the cost of health care more transparent — it’s a statewide database of insurance claims.

Georgia will join about half of all states that already have an all-payer claims database, or an APCD. The database and visualizations to come were developed with support from the Georgia Tech Research Institute. 

Wired

Want to Store a Message in DNA? That’ll Be $1,000

You probably keep a backup of important personal files, photos, and videos on a flash drive or external hard drive. In the not-too-distant future, you might store that data in DNA instead. 
 

French company Biomemory wants to bring personal DNA-based data storage to the public. Today, the company announced the availability of wallet-sized cards that store one kilobyte of text data each—the equivalent of a short email—using DNA as the storage medium. At $1,000 for two identical cards, the price isn’t exactly comparable to a memory stick. At least not yet.
 

(Subscription may be required)
 

Air Force Research Laboratory

New research study could lead to better flu virus protection for warfighters, public

The United States Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine, or USAFSAM, part of the Air Force Research Laboratory, or AFRL, is collaborating with Georgia Tech and the Georgia Tech Research Institute, or GTRI, on a new research project to design strains of probiotic bacteria that can provide health benefits to stimulate immune recognition of influenza. 

Developing more effective methods to combat influenza could reduce impacts on military readiness and training from outbreaks and augment vaccine efforts to increase force health protection capabilities.

(Also published at Arnold AFB, Edwards AFB, Eglin EFB, Hill AFB, Tinker AFB, and Wright Patterson AFB)

 

Air Force Medical Service

New research study could lead to better flu virus protection for warfighters, public

The United States Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine, or USAFSAM, part of the Air Force Research Laboratory, or AFRL, is collaborating with Georgia Tech and the Georgia Tech Research Institute, or GTRI, on a new research project to design strains of probiotic bacteria that can provide health benefits to stimulate immune recognition of influenza. 

Developing more effective methods to combat influenza could reduce impacts on military readiness and training from outbreaks and augment vaccine efforts to increase force health protection capabilities.

Rail Technology Magazine

Norfolk Southern is deploying digital train inspection portals

Norfolk Southern Corporation, one of America’s largest rail freight companies has begun deploying Digital Train Inspection Portals which it hopes will enhance rail safety across the company's 22-state network.

The portals feature cutting-edge Machine Vision Inspection technology developed in partnership with the Georgia Tech Research Institution (GTRI), and Norfolk Southern's Data Science team, who built the brains behind the program.

Railway Age

NS Launches AI Train Inspection Technology

Norfolk Southern (NS) on Oct. 26 announced that it is deploying Digital Train Inspection Portals to enhance rail safety across the Class I railroad’s 22-state network.
 

According to NS, the portals feature cutting-edge Machine Vision Inspection technology developed in partnership with the Georgia Tech Research Institution (GTRI), which engineered the hardware, and NS’s Data Science/Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Mechanical teams, who “built the brains behind the program.”
 

PR Newswire

Norfolk Southern launches AI train inspection technology

Norfolk Southern Corporation (NYSE: NSC) is deploying Digital Train Inspection Portals to enhance rail safety across the company's 22-state network. The portals feature cutting-edge Machine Vision Inspection technology developed in partnership with the Georgia Tech Research Institution (GTRI), who engineered the hardware, and Norfolk Southern's Data Science/Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Mechanical teams, who built the brains behind the program.
 

The project aims to supercharge Norfolk Southern's safety infrastructure and inspection processes with over a dozen portals to be deployed by the end of 2024.
 

Microwave Journal

TRIAD Streamlines Edge Processing of Data in Phased-Array Antennas

As the number of elements on phased array antennas continues to grow, so does the volume of data that must be processed to extract information from the signals gathered. Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have developed a new approach to intelligently process that data closer to where it is generated — on the antenna subarrays themselves.

Combining technologies including machine learning, field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), graphics processing units (GPUs) and a new RF image processing algorithm, the research has streamlined the modular handling of radar signals to reduce processing time and cost. The improvements — as much as two or three orders of magnitude — could lead to real-time analysis of RF image data from sources ranging from potential enemy targets to speeding automobiles headed toward collisions.

New Electronics

TRIAD streamlines edge processing of data in phased-array antennas

As the number of elements on phased array antennas continues to grow, so does the volume of data that must be processed to extract information from the signals gathered. Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have developed a new approach to intelligently process that data closer to where it is generated - on the antenna subarrays themselves.

Combining technologies including machine learning, field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), graphics processing units (GPUs), and a new radio-frequency image processing algorithm, the research has streamlined the modular handling of radar signals to reduce processing time and cost. The improvements – as much as two or three orders of magnitude – could lead to real-time analysis of RF image data from sources ranging from potential enemy targets to speeding automobiles headed toward collisions.

VA News

Veteran Of The Day Navy Veteran Richard H. Truly

Originally from Mississippi, Richard Truly earned a bachelor’s degree in aeronautical engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology. During his time in school, he was a member of the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps. After graduation, he attended Navy flight school and became a naval aviator in October 1960.

After Truly completed the STS-8 mission, he served as the first commander of the Naval Space Command and retired from the Navy as a vice admiral in June 1989. The following day, he was sworn in as the eighth administrator of NASA, serving from 1989 to 1992. After his service, Truly held vice president and director positions at the Georgia Tech Research Institute and the Department of Energy.

The Daily Mail

Incredible moment photographer captured 'gigantic jets' of lightning that are bright red and can reach the edge of Space

Meteorologists call them 'gigantic jets' — powerful and vanishingly rare trees of lightning that contain 50-times more energy than the typical lightning bolt. A Puerto Rico-based photographer documented this little-seen weather phenomenon late last month, August 20th, while documenting the tropical storm then developing westward into Hurricane Franklin.
 

Levi Boggs, a researcher at the Georgia Tech Research Institute, assembled a team to review satellite, radar and radio-wave data of the Oklahoma jet after seeing a civilian photograph of the event not unlike these new images.
 

Metro Atlanta CEO

GridTrust Helps Protect the Nation's Electric Utilities from Cyber Threats

A new cybersecurity technology that relies on the unique digital fingerprint of individual semiconductor chips could help protect the equipment of electrical utilities from malicious attacks that exploit software updates on devices controlling the critical infrastructure. 
The GridTrust project, which has been successfully tested in a real substation of a U.S. municipal power system, combines the digital fingerprint with cryptographic technology to provide enhanced security for the utilities and other critical industrial systems that must update control device software or firmware. Led by researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) in collaboration with the City of Marietta, Georgia the project was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Cybersecurity, Energy Security, and Emergency Response (CESER).
 

Power Grid International

Could a semiconductor chip’s “digital fingerprint” help protect utilities from cyber threats?

A new cybersecurity technology that relies on the unique digital fingerprint of individual semiconductor chips could be used to help protect the equipment of electrical utilities from malicious attacks that exploit software updates on devices controlling the critical infrastructure.
 

The GridTrust project, which researchers say has been successfully tested in a real substation of a U.S. municipal power system, combines the digital fingerprint with cryptographic technology to provide security for the utilities and other critical industrial systems that must update control device software or firmware. Led by researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) in collaboration with the City of Marietta, Georgia the project was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Cybersecurity, Energy Security, and Emergency Response (CESER).

 

Association of Old Crows

US Air Force’s Angry Kitten Turns Reaper Drone Into Fierce Feline of Electronic Warfare

The US Air Force is turning to an unlikely place to beef up its electronic warfare countermeasures: a decade-old aircraft-mounted pod known as the "Angry Kitten."

While not a new device for the USAF, the latest tests involved the first flight of the Angry Kitten Electronic Warfare Pod on an unmanned craft, in this case a General Atomics MQ-9A Reaper drone. Angry Kitten, developed at the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI), is more aptly described as a full-fledged cat at this point, with work on the pod going way back to 2013.